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Edwards Aquifer Protection

Information on the Edwards Aquifer Protection Program.

Map-Viewer Disclaimer

Links to the Edwards Aquifer map viewer.

To access the Edwards Aquifer map viewer, you must agree to this disclaimer and click on “I agree” below. If you have questions, please contact us at eapp@tceq.texas.gov, or our offices in Austin (Region 11) or San Antonio (Region 13).

Terms and Conditions

This Web application’s intent is to show those areas of central Texas regulated by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality under rules adopted in 30 Texas Administrative Code Chapter 213 Exit the TCEQ. Users should consult the full metadata related to these boundaries before submitting any plans prepared using this application.

We make every effort to provide and maintain accurate, complete, usable, and timely information on our Web sites, within the limits described in the metadata accompanying this Web application. Users are cautioned to consider carefully the limitations of these data and information before using them for decisions that concern personal or public safety or the conduct of business that involves substantial monetary or operational consequences. Conclusions drawn from, or actions undertaken on the basis of, such data and information are the sole responsibility of the user. Neither the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, the State of Texas, nor any other agency thereof, nor any of their employees, contractors, or subcontractors, make any warranty, express or implied, nor assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, nor represent that its use would not infringe on privately owned rights.

The topographic maps used in this Web application are based on the most current maps published by the United States Geological Survey Exit the TCEQ. Neither the United States Geological Survey, the U.S. Government, nor any other agency thereof, nor any of their employees, contractors, or subcontractors, make any warranty, express or implied, nor assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, nor represent that its use would not infringe on privately owned rights.

By agreeing with this disclaimer, you, the user, acknowledge that any reliance upon any information shall be at the sole risk of the user. The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality reserves the right, in its sole discretion, to make improvements to, or correct any error or omissions in, any portion of the site. In no event shall the State of Texas be liable for any direct, indirect, incidental, or consequential damage of any kind whatsoever with respect to the information gathered from this website.

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Notice of Fee Rule Changes

PDF document icon — PDF document, 6 kB (7025 bytes)

Contributing Zone Plan

Provides the definition of a contributing zone plan, outlines who is required to submit a plan to the TCEQ, lists the required forms, and provides fee information.

What is a contributing zone plan (CZP)?

A contributing zone plan outlines best management practices that will be implemented in order to protect water quality when a regulated activity Exit the TCEQ is conducted in the contributing zone of the Edwards Aquifer. The contributing zone is the area or watershed where runoff from precipitation flows to the recharge zone of the Edwards Aquifer.

Who is required to prepare and submit a CZP?

A contributing zone plan is required for any regulated activity proposed in the Edwards Aquifer contributing zone. See 30 TAC 213.21 Exit the TCEQ for additional information regarding applicability.

When should a CZP be submitted to the TCEQ?

A CZP must go through the application submission and review process and be approved prior to the commencement of construction or other regulated activities.

How much is the fee?

The fee is based on the acreage of the entire area included within the legal boundaries of the property described in the application and the type of development (one single-family dwelling; multiple single-family residential or parks; or nonresidential). The minimum fee is $650; the maximum, $10,000. For additional information on fees, view the Application Fee Form (TCEQ-0574), which includes a complete fee schedule.

How do I know what forms to complete?

Use the forms listed below to prepare your contributing zone plan application. 

Are there any tips for completing this type of plan?

  • Do not leave any questions unanswered. If a question does not apply to your site, enter “N/A” in the blank and briefly explain why the question does not apply.
  • The contributing zone plan must include information on stormwater best management practices that will be used during construction. You may complete either the temporary stormwater section* or a storm water pollution prevention plan**, which is required by the TPDES Construction General Permit, to satisfy this requirement.

Contributing Zone Plan Application

*Temporary Stormwater Section

**Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan

Notice of Intent (NOI) for Stormwater Discharges Associated with Construction Activity under TPDES General Permit (TXR150000)

Agent Authorization

  • Form (TCEQ-0599), if application submitted by agent

Application Fee

  • Form (TCEQ-0574)
  • Check payable to the “Texas Commission on Environmental Quality”

Core Data Form

Who can I contact if I need help?

If you are located in Williamson, Travis, or Hays County, call the TCEQ’s Austin Regional Office at 512-339-2929. For help in Comal, Bexar, Medina, Uvalde, or Kinney County, call TCEQ’s San Antonio Regional Office at 210-490-3096.

Calculation Spreadsheet: TSS Removal

Excel spreadsheet may be used to calculate the required Total Suspended Solids removal.

Using our spreadsheet may decrease the time it takes the agency to review your project. The April 20, 2009, version of the calculation spreadsheet includes a clarification to the sizing for AquaLogic, a correction to the grassy swale flow velocity, a way to oversize Stormceptor and Vortech, and the addition of drop down menus. Include a separate spreadsheet for each drainage basin.

Edwards Aquifer Protection Program

Provides an overview of the Edwards Aquifer Protection Program, which serves to regulate activities that have the potential to pollute the Edwards Aquifer, and provides links to information on Edwards Aquifer protection plans, maps, rules, and technical guidance.

About the Program

The Edwards Aquifer is a home to diverse fauna and is a drinking water source for the city of San Antonio and surrounding central Texas communities. Because it is a karst aquifer, fractures, caves, sinking streams, and sinkholes act as conduits to the aquifer from the surface. While this means that the aquifer recharges quickly after a rain event, it also means that any surface pollution from stormwater runoff or spills will directly impact the water quality of the aquifer, possibly impairing drinking water and affecting the sensitive ecosystem.

The Edwards Aquifer Protection Program was created to protect this precious resource. Visit the Regulatory History of the Edwards Aquifer Web page to learn more about how the program was developed.

Edwards Aquifer Protection Plans

Before building on the recharge, transition, or contributing zones of the Edwards Aquifer, you must first have your plan reviewed and approved by the TCEQ Edwards Aquifer Protection Program. Once a plan is approved, the site will be monitored for compliance. To find out more about Edwards Aquifer protection plans, why they are necessary, and who is required to submit them, visit the Edwards Aquifer Protection Plan Web page.

Review of Your Application

The Edwards Aquifer Program staff conducts an administrative and technical review of all applications. The turnaround time for administrative review can be up to 30 days as outlined in 30 TAC 213.4(e). Generally administrative completeness is determined during the intake meeting or within a few days of receipt. The turnaround time for technical review of an administratively complete Edwards Aquifer application is 90 days as outlined in 30 TAC 213.4(e). Please know that the review and approval time is directly impacted by the quality and completeness of the initial application that is received. In order to conduct a timely review, it is imperative that the information provided in an Edwards Aquifer application include final plans, be accurate, complete, and in compliance with 30 TAC 213.

Maps

Only portions of the Edwards Aquifer are regulated by the TCEQ. To find out if your project is located over a regulated zone of the aquifer, you can use our map viewer. The official boundaries, used in our maps, were drawn using topographic base maps from the U.S. Geological Survey.

Technical Guidance

Rules and Public Comment

You can use the links provided below to find the Edwards Aquifer rules and summaries of the comments received in past hearings and TCEQ actions.

Contact Us

If you are located in Williamson, Travis, or Hays County, call the TCEQ’s Austin Regional Office at 512-339-2929. For help in Comal, Bexar, Medina, Uvalde, or Kinney County, call TCEQ’s San Antonio Regional Office at 210-490-3096.

 

Water Pollution Abatement Plan

Provides the definition of a water pollution abatement plan, outlines who is required to submit a plan to the TCEQ, lists the required forms, and provides fee information.

What is a water pollution abatement plan (WPAP)?

A WPAP is a detailed plan that outlines best management practices that will be implemented in order to protect water quality when a regulated activity Exit the TCEQ is conducted in the Edwards Aquifer recharge zone.

Who is required to prepare and submit a WPAP?

A water pollution abatement plan is required for any regulated activity proposed in the Edwards Aquifer recharge zone. This includes any construction-related activity, such as:

  •  the construction of buildings, utility stations, roads, highways, railroads
  •  clearing, excavation, or any other activities that alter or disturb the topographic, geologic, or existing recharge characteristics of a site
  •  any other activities with a potential for contaminating the Edwards Aquifer and hydrologically connected surface streams

When should a WPAP be submitted to the TCEQ?

A WPAP must go through the application submission and review process and be approved prior to the commencement of construction or other regulated activities.

How much is the fee?

The fee is based on the acreage of the entire area included within the legal boundaries of the property described in the application and the type of development (one single-family dwelling; multiple single-family residential or parks; and non-residential). The minimum fee is $650; the maximum, $10,000. For additional information on fees, view the Application Fee Form (TCEQ-0574), which includes a complete fee schedule.

How do I know what forms to complete?

Use the forms listed below to prepare your water pollution abatement plan application.

If you are installing an organized sewage collection system, an underground storage tank, or an aboveground storage tank, review the Edwards Aquifer Protection Plan - Required Forms Flowchart to determine if additional forms are required.

Are there any tips for completing this type of plan?

  • Do not leave any questions unanswered. If a question does not apply to your site, enter “N/A” in the blank and briefly explain why the question does not apply.

General Information

Geologic Assessment

Water Pollution Abatement Plan Application

Temporary Stormwater Section

Permanent Stormwater Section

Agent Authorization

  • Form (TCEQ-0599), if application submitted by agent

Application Fee

  • Form (TCEQ-0574)
  • Check payable to the “Texas Commission on Environmental Quality”

Core Data Form

Who can I contact if I need help?

If you are located in Williamson, Travis, or Hays County, call the TCEQ’s Austin Regional Office at 512-339-2929. For help in Comal, Bexar, Medina, Uvalde, or Kinney County, call TCEQ’s San Antonio Regional Office at 210-490-3096.

Edwards Aquifer: Expense Report, Fiscal 2006

Expenses for the Edwards Aquifer program in fiscal 2006.

PDF document icon — PDF document, 9 kB (9374 bytes)

Edwards Aquifer Protection Program: Public Comments

Summary of comments received in past hearings and about TCEQ actions.

PDF document icon Comments_2010.pdf — PDF document, 28 kB (29261 bytes)

Underground Storage Tank Facility Plan

Provides the definition of an Underground Storage Tank facility plan, outlines who is required to submit a plan to the TCEQ, lists the required forms, and provides fee information.

What is an Underground Storage Tank (UST) facility plan?

A UST facility plan is a detailed plan that outlines best management practices that will be implemented in order to protect water quality when a regulated underground storage tank facility Exit the TCEQ is constructed in the Edwards Aquifer recharge or transition zones.

Who is required to prepare and submit a UST facility plan?

A UST facility plan is required for the construction or rehabilitation of a storage tank system or systems containing hydrocarbon or hazardous substance where the system(s) are located on the recharge zone or transition zone. A UST system includes tanks, piping, and related systems (30 TAC 213.5(a)(3)).

When should a UST facility plan be submitted to the TCEQ?

A UST facility plan must go through the application submission and review process and be approved prior to the commencement of installation of the tank system.

How much is the fee?

The fee is $650 per tank or piping system. For additional information on fees, view the Application Fee Form (TCEQ-0574), which includes a complete fee schedule.

How do I know what forms to complete?

Use the forms listed below to prepare your UST facility plan application.

If you are installing an organized sewage collection system, an aboveground storage tank, or conducting other regulated activities, review the Edwards Aquifer Protection Plan - Required Forms Flowchart to determine if additional forms are required.

Are there any tips for completing this type of plan?

  • Do not leave any questions unanswered. If a question does not apply to your site, enter “N/A” in the blank and briefly explain why the question does not apply.
  • Double-walled tanks and product delivery piping are required.
  • Continuous leak detection is required that will alert the owner at all times, even when the facility is not occupied.
  • Containment sumps beneath piping sumps are also required elements of the plan.

General Information

Geologic Assessment

Underground Storage Tank Facility Plan Application

Temporary Stormwater Section

Permanent Stormwater Section

Agent Authorization

  • Form (TCEQ-0599), if application submitted by agent

Application Fee

  • Form (TCEQ-0574)
  • Check payable to the “Texas Commission on Environmental Quality”

Core Data Form

Who can I contact if I need help?

If you are located in Williamson, Travis, or Hays County, call the TCEQ’s Austin Regional Office at 512-339-2929. For help in Comal, Bexar, Medina, Uvalde, or Kinney County, call TCEQ’s San Antonio Regional Office at 210-490-3096.

Edwards Aquifer Protection Program: Administrative Review

The file contains guidance and checklists used to determine if an Edwards Aquifer protection plan or contributing zone plan is administratively complete.

Zip archive icon Admin Checklist - (sep 2012).docx — Zip archive, 82 kB (84438 bytes)

Edwards Aquifer Technical Guidance Manual Errata Sheet

A list of errors that will be corrected in the next revision of the technical guidance manual.

PDF document icon — PDF document, 80 kB (82488 bytes)

Aboveground Storage Tank Facility Plan

Provides the definition of an Aboveground Storage Tank facility plan, outlines who is required to submit a plan to the TCEQ, lists the required forms, and provides fee information.

What is an Aboveground Storage Tank (AST) facility plan?

An AST facility plan is a detailed plan that outlines best management practices that will be implemented in order to protect water quality when a regulated aboveground storage tank facility is constructed in the Edwards Aquifer recharge or transition zone.

Who is required to prepare and submit an AST facility plan?

An AST facility plan is required for the installation of permanent aboveground storage tanks at a facility that will have a total storage capacity of 500 gallons or more of static hydrocarbons or hazardous substances on either the recharge or transition zones of the Edwards Aquifer.

Permanent aboveground storage tanks that will have a total storage capacity of less than 500 gallons are not required to have an AST facility plan.

When should an AST facility plan be submitted to the TCEQ?

An AST facility plan must go through the application submission and review process and be approved prior to the commencement of construction of the regulated tanks.

How much is the fee?

The fee is $650 per tank. For additional information on fees, view the Application Fee Form (TCEQ-0574), which includes a complete fee schedule.

How do I know what forms to complete?

Use the forms listed below to prepare your AST facility plan application. 

If you are installing an organized sewage collection system, an underground storage tank, or conducting other regulated activities, review the Edwards Aquifer Protection Plan - Required Forms Flowchart to determine if additional forms are required.

Are there any tips for completing this type of plan?

  • Do not leave any questions unanswered. If a question does not apply to your site, enter “N/A” in the blank and briefly explain why the question does not apply.
  • A containment area is a required element of the plan. Certain double-walled tanks are acceptable in place of the tank containment requirement.
  • If underground piping is proposed, then a continuous leak-detection system is required for the piping.

General Information

Geologic Assessment

Aboveground Storage Tank Facility Plan Application

Temporary Stormwater Section

Permanent Stormwater Section

Agent Authorization

  • Form (TCEQ-0599), if application submitted by agent

Application Fee

  • Form (TCEQ-0574)
  • Check payable to the “Texas Commission on Environmental Quality”

Core Data Form

Who can I contact if I need help?

If you are located in Williamson, Travis, or Hays County, call the TCEQ’s Austin Regional Office at 512-339-2929. For help in Comal, Bexar, Medina, Uvalde, or Kinney County, call TCEQ’s San Antonio Regional Office at 210-490-3096.

Application Submission and Review

Guidance on submitting an Edwards Aquifer protection plan application and an overview of the administrative review process.

Hot Topic Beginning November 1, 2014, the review process for Edwards Aquifer applications will change. By submitting your application, you confirm that your Edwards Aquifer protection plan is final, contains all required information and attachments, and includes the correct number of copies. If the plan is not complete, it will not be accepted. You and your agent will receive a Notice of Deficiency (NOD), and you will have to resubmit the application.

Submitting Your Application

  1. Review your application for administrative completeness. You can review the Edwards Aquifer Protection Plan - Required Forms Flowchart to ensure that you have included all required forms and attachments.
  2. Include the correct number of copies. Submit:
    • one original application,
    • one copy of the application,
    • one copy for each affected incorporated city,
    • one copy for each county in which the project will be located, and
    • one copy for each groundwater conservation district (Groundwater Conservation Districts within the EAPP Boundaries).
  3. Ensure that your construction plans are at a scale large enough for the reviewer to easily see all pertinent information. Please provide one full-size set of plan sheets with the original application and half-size sets with each additional copy.
  4. Submit your completed application to the TCEQ regional office that serves the county where your project is located. The best way to submit your application is by appointment with an EAPP staff member. We will meet with either you or your agent to review your application and discuss any points you want to further explore.

Hays, Travis and Williamson Counties:
Austin Regional Office
12100 Park 35 Circle
Austin, TX 78753
512-339-2929

Bexar, Comal, Kinney, Medina and Uvalde Counties:
San Antonio Regional Office
14250 Judson Rd.
San Antonio, TX 78233-4480
210-490-3096

Our Review of Your Application

The Edwards Aquifer program staff conducts an administrative and technical review of all applications. The turnaround time for administrative review can be up to 30 days as outlined in 30 TAC 213.4(e). Generally administrative completeness is determined during the intake meeting or within a few days of receipt. The turnaround time for technical review of an administratively complete Edwards Aquifer application is 90 days as outlined in 30 TAC 213.4(e). Please know that the review and approval time is directly impacted by the quality and completeness of the initial application that is received. In order to conduct a timely review, it is imperative that the information provided in an Edwards Aquifer application include final plans, be accurate, complete, and in compliance with 30 TAC 213 Exit the TCEQ.

Administrative Review

  1. Edwards Aquifer applications must be deemed administratively complete before a technical review can begin. To be considered administratively complete, the application must contain completed forms and attachments, provide the requested information, and meet all the site plan requirements. The submitted application and plan sheets should be final plans. Please submit one full-size set of plan sheets with the original application, and half-size sets with the additional copies.

    To ensure that all applicable documents are included in the application, the program has developed tools to guide you and web pages to provide all forms, checklists, and guidance. Please visit the Edwards Aquifer Protection Plans Web page to view these resources.
  2. This Edwards Aquifer Application Cover Page ”Word form (certified by the applicant or agent) must be included in the application and brought to the administrative review meeting.
  3. Administrative reviews are scheduled with program staff who will conduct the review. Applicants or their authorized agent should call the appropriate regional office, according to the county in which the project is located, to schedule a review. The average meeting time is one hour.
  4. In the meeting, the application is examined for administrative completeness. Deficiencies will be noted by staff and emailed or faxed to the applicant and authorized agent at the end of the meeting, or shortly after. Administrative deficiencies will cause the application to be deemed incomplete and returned.
    An appointment should be made to resubmit the application. The application is re-examined to ensure all deficiencies are resolved. The application will only be deemed administratively complete when all administrative deficiencies are addressed.
  5. If an application is received by mail, courier service, or otherwise submitted without a review meeting, the administrative review will be conducted within 30 days. The applicant and agent will be contacted with the results of the administrative review. If the application is found to be administratively incomplete, it can be retrieved from the regional office or returned by regular mail. If returned by mail, the regional office may require arrangements for return shipping.
  6. If the geologic assessment was completed before October 1, 2004 and the site contains “possibly sensitive” features, the assessment must be updated in accordance with the Instructions to Geologists (TCEQ-0585 Instructions).

Technical Review

  1. When an application is deemed administratively complete, the technical review period begins. The regional office will distribute copies of the application to the identified affected city, county, and groundwater conservation district whose jurisdiction includes the subject site. These entities and the public have 30 days to provide comments on the application to the regional office. All comments received are reviewed by TCEQ.
  2. A site assessment is usually conducted as part of the technical review, to evaluate the geologic assessment and observe existing site conditions. The site must be accessible to our staff. The site boundaries should be clearly marked, features identified in the geologic assessment should be flagged, roadways marked and the alignment of the Sewage Collection System and manholes should be staked at the time the application is submitted. If the site is not marked the application may be returned.
  3. We evaluate the application for technical completeness and contact the applicant and agent via Notice of Deficiency (NOD) to request additional information and identify technical deficiencies. There are two deficiency response periods available to the applicant. There are 14 days to resolve deficiencies noted in the first NOD. If a second NOD is issued, there is an additional 14 days to resolve deficiencies. If the response to the second notice is not received, is incomplete or inadequate, or provides new information that is incomplete or inadequate, the application must be withdrawn or if not withdrawn the application will be denied and the application fee will be forfeited.
  4. The program has 90 calendar days to complete the technical review of the application. If the application is technically adequate, such that it complies with the Edwards Aquifer rules, and is protective of the Edwards Aquifer during and after construction, an approval letter will be issued. Construction or other regulated activity may not begin until an approval is issued.

Mid-Review Modifications

It is important to have final site plans prior to beginning the permitting process with TCEQ to avoid delays.
Occasionally, circumstances arise where you may have significant design and/or site plan changes after your Edwards Aquifer application has been deemed administratively complete by TCEQ. This is considered a “Mid-Review Modification”. Mid-Review Modifications may require redistribution of an application that includes the proposed modifications for public comment.
If you are proposing a Mid-Review Modification, two options are available to you:

• You can withdraw your application, and your fees will be refunded or credited for a resubmittal.
• TCEQ can continue the technical review of the application as it was submitted, and a modification application can be submitted at a later time.

If the application is withdrawn, the resubmitted application will be subject to the administrative and technical review processes and will be treated as a new application. The application will be redistributed to the effected jurisdictions.

Contact Us

If you are located in Williamson, Travis, or Hays County, call the TCEQ’s Austin Regional Office at 512-339-2929. For help in Comal, Bexar, Medina, Uvalde, or Kinney County, call TCEQ’s San Antonio Regional Office at 210-490-3096.

Optional Enhanced Measures

Explains the TCEQ Optional Enhanced Measures.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service issued letters on September 4, 2007, to Governor Rick Perry and the TCEQ concerning the agency's Appendix A to RG-348: Optional Enhanced Measures for the Protection of Water Quality in the Edwards Aquifer (Revised) and Appendix B to RG-348: Optional Enhanced Measures for the Protection of Water Quality in the Edwards Aquifer and Related Karst Features that May Be Habitat for Karst Dwelling Invertebrates.

The letters are a concurrence that non-federal landowners and other non-federal managers under the TCEQ Edwards Aquifer Protection Program would have the support of the Service that no take under the Endangered Species Act would occur if they make use of the optional measures.

These optional measures, voluntary under the Edwards Aquifer Protection Program, will protect certain federally listed species from potential water quality impacts that may have otherwise resulted from development over the Edwards Aquifer region.

The original concurrence letter was issued to Governor Rick Perry on February 14, 2005.

TCEQ approval letters issued to applicants who employ the optional measures will include a statement that the optional water quality measures were met. Some situations will still warrant direct consultation with the USFWS, including projects located near springs, those requiring a federal permit, those that are unrelated to water quality and affect listed species, and those affecting other listed species not covered by the measures.

Edwards Aquifer Technical Guidance Manual: Addendum Sheet

The addendum sheet lists additional information that is approved for inclusion in the manual.

PDF document icon Addendum Sheet revised 07_05_12.pdf — PDF document, 2220 kB (2274289 bytes)

Edwards Aquifer: 2006 Public Meeting Notice

PDF document icon — PDF document, 14 kB (14542 bytes)

Regulatory History of the Edwards Aquifer

Explains the history of State regulations to protect the Edwards Aquifer.

 

This page outlines only the key events in the history of the Edwards Aquifer Protection Program. For a comprehensive understanding of our TCEQ regulations protecting the Edwards Aquifer, we recommend you review the current rules. We also have several TCEQ publications to assist you and program staff are always available to answer your questions.

Legislative History

The Edwards Aquifer is one of the most valuable water resources in the central Texas area. This aquifer provides water for municipal, industrial, and agricultural uses. A number of cities rely on the aquifer as their only source of drinking water. In the past, the Aquifer has proved to be a reliable source of water through severe droughts. In fact, the Aquifer is the sole source of drinking water for over 1.7 million people in Central Texas. It covers 4,350 square miles in parts of 11 counties.

Over wide areas, the aquifer produces large volumes of water from several layers of highly permeable and porous honeycombed rock. Because the aquifer is highly permeable, and has rapid recharge and discharge, the aquifer produces large quantities of water. However, these same properties make the aquifer highly vulnerable to contamination where it is exposed at the surface in the aquifer recharge zone. Pollutants on and near the surface can directly enter the aquifer with little natural attenuation and travel long distances in a relatively short period of time.

In 1959, the Texas Legislature created the Edwards Underground Water District. The district supplied maps that were previously unavailable, and assisted licensing authorities. The importance of protecting the quality of the water in the Edwards Aquifer was not recognized until 1970, when the Texas Water Quality Board issued the first regulations for the protection of the aquifer recharge and buffer zones.

The first counties affected were Kinney, Uvalde, Medina, Bexar, Comal, and Hays. Sources of pollution such as underground storage tanks, above-ground storage tanks, and sewer lines were regulated.

Water-pollution abatement plans were first required in 1974. By 1984, the plans were required for regulated developments including residential, commercial, and industrial. A geologic assessment was required for housing developments with 100 or more family living units, and non-residential developments greater than 5 acres. Also in 1984, ongoing testing requirements for sewer lines were established.

Beginning in 1977, the installation of new underground storage tank sites had to be approved prior to construction. The sites were required to have double walled tanks and piping as well as a method of leak detection. These standards were in advance of the statewide regulations on underground storage tank systems that first went into effect in 1989.

In 1988, fees were assessed for all types of development. As a result of legislation, the schedule of fees was increased in 1997. These one-time fees cover the review of the protection plans as well as inspections during and after construction is complete. The money is used to support program efforts.

Upon petition by local government, construction activities in portions of Williamson County became regulated in 1986. Then in 1990, construction in portions of Travis County was first regulated.

Also in 1990, geologic assessment requirements for residential developments were decreased to 25 or more units, plus notification of recharge features was made mandatory. Today, a geologic assessment is required for all new, regulated developments except residential sites less than 10 acres.

Significant rules changes went into effect in 1999. The changes included a design performance standard for permanent best management practices. The standard applies to water quality systems used for stormwater treatment. Examples include sand filtration basins, extended detention basins, and retention ponds with irrigation systems. The rules also require engineers to certify the construction of the systems and to ensure maintenance of these systems.

The 1999 rules changes brought the contributing zone into regulation. Regulated activities are those that have the potential for polluting surface streams that will cross the recharge zone, including large construction projects and installation of petroleum storage tanks.

In 2001, the agency began distributing contributing-zone plans to affected municipalities, counties, or groundwater conservation districts according to House Bill 2912 (71st regular legislative session), which added Texas Water Code 26.137, mandating a 30-day public comment period for the applications. Also as a result of this House Bill, TWC §26.051 was added requiring the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to prepare reports of annual expenditures of funds related to the Edwards Aquifer Protection Program. Senate Bill 59 repealed TWC §26.051, effective September 1, 2013.

For More Information

You may also speak directly with the TCEQ staff by calling our offices in Austin (Region 11) or San Antonio (Region 13).

Extension Request

Requirements relating to a request for an extension of an Edwards Aquifer protection plan and the forms that are required.

When does an Edwards Aquifer protection plan expire?

The TCEQ’s approval of an Edwards Aquifer protection plan will expire two years after the date of initial issuance unless, prior to the expiration date, substantial construction related to the approved plan has commenced. Substantial construction means that more than 10% of total construction has commenced. The definition of substantial construction can be found in 30 TAC 213.4(h) Exit the TCEQ for the recharge and transition zones and in 30 TAC 213.23(g) Exit the TCEQ for the contributing zone of the Edwards Aquifer.

Note: An Edwards Aquifer protection plan will expire and no extension will be granted if more than 50% of the total construction has not been completed within ten years from the initial approval of a plan.

When should an extension request be submitted?

An extension request must be received before the plan expires, but not more than 60 days before the expiration date of the approved protection plan or a previously approved extension. If an extension request is received after the expiration date of an approved protection plan or previously approved extension, then the request cannot be approved and a new application with appropriate fees will be required. Also, we cannot grant an extension if the proposed regulated activity or approved plan has changed.

When does an approved extension expire?

The approved extension will expire six months after the original expiration date of the approved plan or the last approved extension.

How much is the fee?

The fee for each extension request is $150. For additional information on fees, view the Application Fee Form (TCEQ-0574), which includes a complete fee schedule.

How do I know what forms to complete?

The forms listed below are grouped by Recharge and Transition Zones or Contributing Zone. Use the applicable forms to prepare your exception request. 

Are there any tips for completing this request?

Do not leave any questions unanswered. If a question does not apply to your site, enter “N/A” in the blank and briefly explain why the question does not apply.

Forms - Recharge and Transition Zone

Extension Request for an Edwards Aquifer Protection Plan

Agent Authorization

  • Form (TCEQ-0599), if application submitted by agent

Application Fee

  • Form (TCEQ-0574)
  • Check payable to the “Texas Commission on Environmental Quality”

Core Data Form

 

Forms - Contributing Zone

Extension Request for a Contributing Zone Plan

Agent Authorization

  • Form (TCEQ-0599), if application submitted by agent

Application Fee

  • Form (TCEQ-0574)
  • Check payable to the “Texas Commission on Environmental Quality”

Core Data Form

 

Who can I contact if I need help?

If you are located in Williamson, Travis, or Hays County, call the TCEQ’s Austin Regional Office at 512-339-2929. For help in Comal, Bexar, Medina, Uvalde, or Kinney County, call TCEQ’s San Antonio Regional Office at 210-490-3096.

Edwards Aquifer Map Viewer

View the Edwards Aquifer maps of regulated zones with your web browser.

Use the Edwards Aquifer Map Viewer to see the areas of Texas that are subject to regulation by the TCEQ under the Edwards Aquifer Protection Program. You can print a copy of the map to submit with your application.

  • Help—Coming Soon!
  • Open the Map Viewer—Best viewed using Internet Explorer V9.0 and above Firefox V22.0 and above, and Google Chrome V28.0 and above.
  • Geospatial Data Layer Documentation, also known as metadata—Describes the geospatial data layer. The Edwards Aquifer maps come from official printed maps, containing regulatory boundaries based on previous geologic interpretations of the Edwards Aquifer zones—that is, the recharge, transition, and contributing within the transition zones, as defined in 30 TAC 213 Exit the TCEQ.
  • Contact Us—E-mail the Edwards Aquifer Program staff at eapp@tceq.texas.gov or talk with staff in the TCEQ Austin Regional Office at 512/339-2929 or the San Antonio Regional Office at 210/490-3096.

Edwards Aquifer Protection Plans

Provides the definition of an Edwards Aquifer protection plan, explains why they are necessary, and outlines who is required to prepare and submit them to the TCEQ.

What is an Edwards Aquifer protection plan?

An Edwards Aquifer protection plan (EAPP) outlines the best management practices that will be implemented and maintained — both during and after construction activities — to prevent contaminants found in storm water from reaching the Edwards Aquifer.

The EAPP may include: a water pollution abatement plan, organized sewage collection system plan, underground storage tank facility plan, aboveground storage tank facility plan, contributing zone plan, or a modification, exception, or extension request granted by the executive director.

Why are these plans necessary?

These plans are necessary to ensure that steps are taken to protect groundwater and maintain Texas Surface Water Quality Standards in areas that will impact the Edwards Aquifer.

Who is required to prepare and submit an Edwards Aquifer protection plan?

If you plan to conduct a regulated activity (such as construction, land clearing, aboveground or underground storage tank installation) over the Edwards Aquifer, you must submit your plan to the TCEQ for approval prior to disturbing soil at the site.

A complete list of regulated activities, including exclusions, can be found in 30 TAC 213.3(28) Exit the TCEQ for the recharge and transition zones and in 30 TAC 213.22(6) Exit the TCEQ  for the contributing zone of the Edwards Aquifer.

How do I know what forms to complete?

There are a number of forms that are required for each plan type. In order to help you figure out what forms are required, you can use the Edwards Aquifer Protection Plan Flowchart.

Where can I find more information?

You can find additional information on the Edwards Aquifer Protection Program Web page.

Who can I contact if I need help?

If you are located in Williamson, Travis, or Hays County, call the TCEQ’s Austin Regional Office at 512-339-2929. For help in Comal, Bexar, Medina, Uvalde, or Kinney County, call TCEQ’s San Antonio Regional Office at 210-490-3096.

Organized Sewage Collection System Plan

Provides the definition of an Organized Sewage Collection System (SCS), the definition of an SCS plan, outlines who is required to submit a plan to the TCEQ, lists the required forms, and provides fee information.

What is an Organized Sewage Collection System (SCS)?

An organized sewage collection system (SCS) is any public or private sewerage system for the collection and conveyance of sewage to a treatment and disposal system that is regulated pursuant to rules of the commission and provisions of Chapter 26 of the Texas Water Code Exit the TCEQ. A system includes:

  • lift stations,
  • force mains,
  • gravity lines, and
  • all appurtenances necessary for conveying wastewater from a generating facility to a treatment plant.

A private sewerage system is the portion of the sewage system for a privately owned commercial, industrial, or multifamily development which extends downgradient from the convergence of two or more private service laterals from wastewater-generating facilities. This sewage collection system must be designed to meet the requirements of 30 TAC Chapter 217 Exit the TCEQ and 30 TAC Chapter 213 Exit the TCEQ.

What is an SCS plan?

An SCS plan is a detailed plan that outlines best management practices that will be implemented in order to protect water quality when an organized SCS is constructed in the Edwards Aquifer recharge zone.

Who is required to prepare and submit an SCS plan?

You are required to submit an SCS plan if you plan to construct an SCS over the recharge zone of the Edwards Aquifer.

When should an SCS plan be submitted to the TCEQ?

An SCS plan must go through the application submission and review process and be approved prior to the commencement of construction.

How much is the fee?

The fee is assessed at $0.50 per linear foot. The minimum fee is $650; the maximum, $6,500. For additional information on fees, view the Application Fee Form (TCEQ-0574), which includes a complete fee schedule.

How do I know what forms to complete?

Use the forms listed below to prepare your SCS plan application.

If you are installing an underground storage tank, an aboveground storage tank, or conducting other regulated activities, review the Edwards Aquifer Protection Plan - Required Forms Flowchart to determine if additional forms are required.

Are there any tips for completing this type of plan?

  • Do not leave any questions unanswered. If a question does not apply to your site, enter “N/A” in the blank and briefly explain why the question does not apply.
  • SCS plans are not required on the Edwards Aquifer transition or contributing zone.
  • A private service lateral (attachment of one wastewater generating structure to an existing sewage collection system line) does not require TCEQ approval, but must comply with local plumbing codes.
  • The construction plans for the system, which are included with the submission must be designed, sealed, signed, and dated by a Texas licensed professional engineer. The designed plans must be the final plans intended to be used for bidding purposes.

General Information

Geologic Assessment

Organized Sewage Collection System Plan Application

Lift Station/Force Main System Application (if applicable)

Temporary Stormwater Section

Agent Authorization

  • Form (TCEQ-0599), if application submitted by agent

Application Fee

  • Form (TCEQ-0574)
  • Check payable to the “Texas Commission on Environmental Quality”

Core Data Form

Who can I contact if I need help?

If you are located in Williamson, Travis, or Hays County, call the TCEQ’s Austin Regional Office at 512-339-2929. For help in Comal, Bexar, Medina, Uvalde, or Kinney County, call TCEQ’s San Antonio Regional Office at 210-490-3096.

Exception Request

Outlines when it is appropriate to request an exception from provisions of the Edwards Aquifer rules and the forms that are required.

Under what circumstances is an exception request appropriate?

You may request an exception from any or all of the substantive provisions of the Edwards Aquifer rules. Two examples include:

  • an activity that does not involve construction, but does include minor soil disturbance and stabilization.
  • an exception from submitting a water pollution abatement plan because your site has been developed before, and you plan on adding a negligible increase in impervious cover.

As part of your request, you must provide evidence that water quality will be protected.

We cannot grant an exception for a prohibited activity (30 TAC 213.8 Exit the TCEQ) such as new feedlots or waste disposal wells on the recharge zone.

Under what circumstances is an exception request not necessary?

Some types of exception requests are appropriate elements of the plan application, so you do not need to make a separate exception request for things such as:

  • a request to use innovative technology as your permanent best management practice;
  • to use an existing geologic assessment for your application; or
  • a variance from the minimum or maximum flow rate for sewage lines for your organized sewage collection system plan.

When should an exception request be submitted?

The request must go through the application submission and review process and be approved prior to the commencement construction or other regulated activities.

How much is the fee?

The fee for each exception request is $500. For additional information on fees, view the Application Fee Form (TCEQ-0574), which includes a complete fee schedule.

How do I know what forms to complete?

The forms listed below are grouped by Recharge and Transition Zones or Contributing Zone. Use the applicable forms to prepare your exception request.

Are there any tips for completing this request?

Do not leave any questions unanswered. If a question does not apply to your site, enter “N/A” in the blank and briefly explain why the question does not apply.

 

Forms - Recharge and Transition Zone

The following forms are required when requesting an exception in the Recharge or Transition Zones of the Edwards Aquifer.

General Information

Geologic Assessment (if applicable)

Recharge and Transition Zone Exception Request

Temporary Stormwater Section (if applicable)

Permanent Stormwater Section (if applicable)

Agent Authorization

  • Form (TCEQ-0599), if application submitted by agent

Application Fee

  • Form (TCEQ-0574)
  • Check payable to the “Texas Commission on Environmental Quality”

Core Data Form

 

Forms - Contributing Zone

The following forms are required when requesting an exception in the Contributing Zone of the Edwards Aquifer.

Contributing Zone Exception Request

Agent Authorization

  • Form (TCEQ-0599), if application submitted by agent

Application Fee

  • Form (TCEQ-0574)
  • Check payable to the “Texas Commission on Environmental Quality”

Core Data Form

Who can I contact if I need help?

If you have any questions about whether you need an exception request, contact the Edwards Aquifer Protection Program staff in your local regional office.

If you are located in Williamson, Travis, or Hays County, call the TCEQ’s Austin Regional Office at 512-339-2929. For help in Comal, Bexar, Medina, Uvalde, or Kinney County, call TCEQ’s San Antonio Regional Office at 210-490-3096.

Edwards Aquifer Forms, Instructions, and Checklists

Application forms, instructions, and checklists for Edwards Aquifer protection plans.

Hot Topic Beginning November 1, 2014, the review process for Edwards Aquifer applications will change. By submitting your application, you confirm that your Edwards Aquifer protection plan is final, contains all required information and attachments, and includes the correct number of copies. If the plan is not complete, it will not be accepted. You and your agent will receive a Notice of Deficiency (NOD), and you will have to resubmit the application.

Download Individual Application Forms, Instructions, and Checklists

Please note: Do not leave any questions unanswered. If a question does not apply to your site, enter “N/A” in the blank and briefly explain why the question does not apply. If you alter the form in any way, the application will not be reviewed and will be returned to you.

Form Number Description Format Format
TCEQ-0574 Application Fee Form PDF Word
TCEQ-0575 Aboveground Storage Tank Facility Plan Application PDF Word
TCEQ-0575 Checklist Aboveground Storage Tank Facility Plan Application — Checklist PDF
TCEQ-0582 Sewage Collection System Application PDF Word
TCEQ-0582 Checklist Sewage Collection System Application — Checklist PDF
TCEQ-0583 Underground Storage Tank Facility Plan Application PDF Word
TCEQ-0583 Instructions Examples of Project Description for New and Modified Underground Storage Tank Facilities PDF Word
TCEQ-0583 Checklist Underground Storage Tank Facility Plan Application — Checklist PDF
TCEQ-0584 Water Pollution Abatement Plan Application PDF Word
TCEQ-0584 Checklist Water Pollution Abatement Plan Application — Checklist PDF
TCEQ-0585 Geologic Assessment PDF Word
TCEQ-0585 Instructions Instructions to Geologists PDF Word
TCEQ-0585 Table Geologic Assessment Table PDF Excel
TCEQ-0587 General Information Form PDF Word
TCEQ-0590 Modification to a Previously Approved Plan PDF Word
TCEQ-0590 Checklist Modification to a Previously Approved Plan — Checklist PDF
TCEQ-0591 Lift Stations and Force Mains, General Construction Notes PDF Word
TCEQ-0592 Water Pollution Abatement Plan, General Construction Notes PDF Word
TCEQ-0592A Contributing Zone Plan, General Construction Notes PDF Word
TCEQ-0596 Organized Sewage Collection System, General Construction Notes PDF Word
TCEQ-0599 Agent Authorization Form PDF Word
TCEQ-0600 Permanent Stormwater Section PDF Word
TCEQ-0602 Temporary Stormwater Section PDF Word
TCEQ-0624 Lift Station/Force Main System Application PDF Word
TCEQ-0625 Deed Recordation Affidavit—Edwards Aquifer Protection Plan PDF Word
TCEQ-0625A Deed Recordation Affidavit—Contributing Zone Plan PDF Word
TCEQ-0628 Recharge and Transition Zone Exception Request Form PDF Word
TCEQ-0628 Checklist Recharge and Transition Zone Exception Request Form — Checklist PDF
TCEQ-10256 Solution Feature Discovery Notification Form PDF Word
TCEQ-10257 Contributing Zone Plan Application PDF Word
TCEQ-10257 Checklist Contributing Zone Plan Application — Checklist PDF
TCEQ-10259 Modification of a Previously Approved Contributing Zone Plan PDF Word
TCEQ-10259 Checklist Modification of a Previously Approved Contributing Zone Plan — Checklist PDF
TCEQ-10260 Extension Request for an Edwards Aquifer Protection Plan PDF Word
TCEQ-10260 Checklist Edwards Aquifer Protection Plan Extension Request — Checklist PDF
TCEQ-10261 Extension Request for a Contributing Zone Plan PDF Word
TCEQ-10261 Checklist Contributing Zone Extension Request — Checklist PDF
TCEQ-10262 Contributing Zone Exception Request Form PDF Word
TCEQ-10262 Checklist Contributing Zone Exception Request — Checklist PDF
TCEQ-10263 Change in Responsibility for Maintenance on Permanent Best Management Practices and Measures PDF Word
TCEQ-10400 Core Data Form PDF Word
TCEQ-10400 Instructions Core Data Form Instructions PDF
TCEQ-20705 Edwards Aquifer Application Cover Page Word

If you find any errors or inconsistencies in these documents, please contact us at eapp@tceq.texas.gov. We welcome your suggestions for improving these applications.

Where to Obtain Edwards Aquifer Zone Maps

Vendors for Edwards Aquifer Recharge, Contributing, and Transition Zone Maps.

The officially marked Edwards Aquifer zone maps are USGS Exit the TCEQ

topographic maps for individual quadrangles that contain portions of the recharge, contributing or transition zone. The last mapping change went into effect on September 1, 2005. Modifications were made to the existing boundaries in Travis, Hays, Comal, and Bexar Counties.

 

Vendors of Officially Marked
Edwards Aquifer Zone Maps
Maps of quadrangles in
these counties:
Vendor:
Hays, Comal,
Bexar, Medina,
Uvalde, Kinney
Mapsco Exit the TCEQ
610 West Sunset Road
San Antonio, TX 78216
(210) 829-7629
Williamson,
Travis, Hays
Thomas Reprographics Exit the TCEQ
7801 N. Lamar Blvd. Suite C57
Austin, TX 78752
(512) 687-1050

The marking of these zones on the official maps is based on the best current understanding of local geologic formations and water movement. These maps are adopted as part of the rules, and we may revise them through our standard rulemaking process when new information is available.

Request for a Modification of a Previously Approved Plan

Forms to complete for a request to modify an approved Edwards Aquifer protection plan.

Under what circumstances would I need to submit a modification request?

A request for a modification to a previously approved plan, or modification plan, is required for any modification to a previously approved Edwards Aquifer protection plan.

You should submit a modification plan:

  • to deviate from your approved plans in the physical design of a pond, dam, berm, sewage treatment plant, flow diverter, or any other structure designed to reduce water pollution;
  • to change the way you intend to operate any of these structures;
  • to change the type of regulated activity from what was originally approved;
  • to make a change that would significantly affect the ability of the plan to prevent pollution of the Edwards Aquifer;
  • to develop land that was to be left undeveloped under your original water pollution abatement plan; and
  • to make a physical modification to an approved organized sewage collection system, UST facility, or AST facility.

When should a modification request be submitted to the TCEQ?

A modification request must go through the application submission and review process and be approved prior to the commencement of the modification.

How much is the fee?

The fee is based on the acreage of the entire area included within the legal boundaries of the property described in the application and the type of development (one single-family dwelling; multiple single-family residential or parks; and non-residential). The minimum fee is $650; the maximum fee, $10,000. For additional information on fees, view the Application Fee Form (TCEQ-0574), which includes a complete fee schedule.

How do I know what forms to complete?

The forms listed below are grouped by Recharge and Transition Zones or Contributing Zone. Use the applicable forms to prepare your modification request. 

Are there any tips for completing this request?

Do not leave any questions unanswered. If a question does not apply to your site, enter “N/A” in the blank and briefly explain why the question does not apply.

 

Forms - Recharge and Transition Zone

The following forms are required when requesting an exception in the Recharge or Transition Zones of the Edwards Aquifer.

General Information

Geologic Assessment

Modification of a Previously Approved Plan

Water Pollution Abatement Plan Application (if applicable)

Temporary Stormwater Section (if applicable)

Permanent Stormwater Section (if applicable)

Underground Storage Tank Facility Plan Application (if applicable)

Aboveground Storage Tank Facility Plan Application (if applicable)

Organized Sewage Collection System Plan Application (if applicable)

Lift Station/Force Main System Application (if applicable)

Agent Authorization

  • Form (TCEQ-0599), if application submitted by agent

Application Fee

  • Form (TCEQ-0574)
  • Check payable to the “Texas Commission on Environmental Quality”

Core Data Form

 

Forms - Contributing Zone

The following forms are required when requesting an exception in the Contributing Zone of the Edwards Aquifer.

Modification of a Previously Approved Contributing Zone Plan

Contributing Zone Plan Application

Temporary Stormwater Section (if applicable)

Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (if applicable)

Notice of Intent (NOI) for Stormwater Discharges Associated with Construction Activity under TPDES General Permit (TXR150000) (if applicable)

Agent Authorization

  • Form (TCEQ-0599), if application submitted by agent

Application Fee

  • Form (TCEQ-0574)
  • Check payable to the “Texas Commission on Environmental Quality”

Core Data Form

Who can I contact if I need help?

If you are located in Williamson, Travis, or Hays County, call the TCEQ’s Austin Regional Office at 512-339-2929. For help in Comal, Bexar, Medina, Uvalde, or Kinney County, call TCEQ’s San Antonio Regional Office at 210-490-3096.

Edwards Aquifer Protection Program: Sign Up for E-mail Updates

Subscribe to e-mail alerts about the Edwards Aquifer Protection Program.

You can receive e-mails whenever we add new information to our Edwards Aquifer Protection Program web page. Click on the link below and do the following:

  • Enter and confirm your e-mail address.
  • From the list of choices, look under “Water Quality” and select “Edwards Aquifer Protection Program”
  • Select other subscriptions if you wish, then click “Save.”
  • The system will then send you a confirmation e-mail to accept.

You can unsubscribe, change your e-mail address, or choose additional options at any time from the link on this page or from the update e-mails you receive.

 

Are you a new subscriber?
Sign up for e-mail updates.

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Edwards Aquifer Maps

Find maps related to the Edwards Aquifer.

Edwards Aquifer: Sensitive Features Encountered During Construction

Overview of the steps that must be taken if sensitive features are encountered during a construction activity over the aquifer.

A sensitive feature, as defined in 30 TAC 213.3(29) is a permeable geologic or artificial feature located on the recharge zone or transition zone where there is a potential for hydraulic interconnectedness between the surface and the Edwards Aquifer and rapid infiltration to the subsurface may occur.

If any sensitive feature is discovered during construction, replacement, or rehabilitation, all regulated activities near the feature must be immediately suspended, and the TCEQ immediately notified. Temporary measures such as silt fence and sandbag berms must be installed as soon as possible to prevent dust and stormwater from entering into the exposed feature. Contact a Texas-licensed professional geologist to evaluate the feature. If a sewer line is to be installed in the area, contact a Texas-licensed professional engineer as well.

Neither construction nor soil-disturbing activities may proceed until the TCEQ has reviewed and approved the methods proposed to protect the feature and the Edwards Aquifer from potential harm to water quality.

Once a Texas-licensed professional engineer or geoscientist prepares a feature-protection plan and the TCEQ receives it, the agency has one week to complete its review unless it identifies deficiencies in the plan.

While waiting for TCEQ approval, install and maintain temporary best management practices to protect the feature from pollution and contamination potential. Also block traffic from the nearby and prevent construction equipment from operating in the vicinity.
Contact Us

If you are located in Williamson, Travis, or Hays county, call the TCEQ’s Austin Regional Office at 512-339-2929. For help in Comal, Bexar, Medina, Uvalde, or Kinney county, call TCEQ’s San Antonio Regional Office at 210-490-3096.

Edwards Aquifer Protection Plan Flowchart

Flowchart to help customers determine which forms are required for Edwards Aquifer protection plans.

PDF document icon Edwards Flowchart.pdf — PDF document, 91 kB (94184 bytes)

About the Edwards Aquifer Protection Plan Flowchart

Introduces and explains a flowchart developed to help customers determine which forms are required when developing an EAPP.

What will this flowchart help me do?

Several forms must be completed in order to develop an Edwards Aquifer protection plan. The Edwards Aquifer Protection Plan Flowchart will help you determine the type of plan and forms necessary to develop your EAPP.

How do I use the flowchart?

Follow the arrows as you answer each question in the flowchart. As you progress through each question, your answers will lead you to boxes with links to the plan pages containing the forms you must complete. Click the links, print the required forms, and return to the flowchart. Continue answering all of the questions until you reach the circle titled “End.”

Who can I contact if I need help?

If you are located in Williamson, Travis, or Hays County, call the TCEQ’s Austin Regional Office at 512-339-2929. For help in Comal, Bexar, Medina, Uvalde, or Kinney County, call TCEQ’s San Antonio Regional Office at 210-490-3096.

Public Hearing on Edwards Aquifer Protection Program

Calendar
The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) will conduct hearings to receive comments from the public on actions the commission should take to protect the Edwards Aquifer from pollution, as required under Texas Water Code, §26.046. This requirement assists the commission in its shared responsibility with local governments such as cities and groundwater conservation districts to protect the water quality of the aquifer.

Event details

When

Dec 16, 2014 02:00 PM Dec 17, 2014 12:00 AM to

Where

TCEQ Park 35 Office Complex, 12100 Park 35 Circle, Building E, Room 201S, Austin, Texas 78753

Contact Name

Contact Phone

(512) 239-6956

Add event to calendar

Annual hearings are held on the Edwards Aquifer Protection Program and the TCEQ rules, 30 Texas Administrative Code (TAC) Chapter 213, which regulate development over the delineated contributing, recharge, and transition zones of the Edwards Aquifer.

The hearings will be held at the following times and locations: Tuesday, December 16, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at the TCEQ Park 35 Office Complex, 12100 Park 35 Circle, Building E, Room 201S, Austin; and Wednesday, December 17, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at the Tesoro Building, Alamo Area Council of Governments, 3rd Floor Classroom 3-01, 8700 Tesoro Drive, San Antonio. 

These hearings will be structured for the receipt of oral or written comments by interested persons. Individuals may present oral statements when called upon. There will be no open discussion during the hearing; however, agency staff members will be available to answer questions 30 minutes prior to and 30 minutes after the conclusion of the hearing. Registration will begin 30 minutes prior to the hearing.

Persons with disabilities who have special communication or other accommodation needs who are planning to attend the Austin hearing should contact the Office of Administrative Services Facilities Liaison at (512) 239-0080. Persons requesting accommodations for the San Antonio hearing should contact Austin Bailey at (512) 239-6956. Requests should be made as far in advance as possible.

Written comments should reference the Edwards Aquifer Protection Program and may be sent to Austin Bailey, Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, Field Operation Program Support Section, MC 174, P.O. Box 13087, Austin, Texas 78711-3087, faxed to (512) 239-2249, or e-mailed to austin.bailey@tceq.texas.gov. Comments must be received by 5:00 p.m., January 16, 2015. For further information or questions concerning these hearings, please contact Mr. Bailey at (512) 239-6956, or http://www.tceq.texas.gov/field/eapp/history.html.

 

More information about this event…

Public Hearing on Edwards Aquifer Protection Program

Calendar
The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) will conduct hearings to receive comments from the public on actions the commission should take to protect the Edwards Aquifer from pollution, as required under Texas Water Code, §26.046. This requirement assists the commission in its shared responsibility with local governments such as cities and groundwater conservation districts to protect the water quality of the aquifer.

Event details

When

02:00 PM 11:55 PM Dec 17, 2014
from to

Where

Tesoro Building, Alamo Area Council of Governments, 3rd Floor Classroom 3-01, 8700 Tesoro Drive, San Antonio, Texas 78217

Contact Name

Contact Phone

(512) 239-6956

Add event to calendar

Annual hearings are held on the Edwards Aquifer Protection Program and the TCEQ rules, 30 Texas Administrative Code (TAC) Chapter 213, which regulate development over the delineated contributing, recharge, and transition zones of the Edwards Aquifer.

The hearings will be held at the following times and locations: Tuesday, December 16, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at the TCEQ Park 35 Office Complex, 12100 Park 35 Circle, Building E, Room 201S, Austin; and Wednesday, December 17, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. at the Tesoro Building, Alamo Area Council of Governments, 3rd Floor Classroom 3-01, 8700 Tesoro Drive, San Antonio.

These hearings will be structured for the receipt of oral or written comments by interested persons. Individuals may present oral statements when called upon. There will be no open discussion during the hearing; however, agency staff members will be available to answer questions 30 minutes prior to and 30 minutes after the conclusion of the hearing. Registration will begin 30 minutes prior to the hearing.

Persons with disabilities who have special communication or other accommodation needs who are planning to attend the Austin hearing should contact the Office of Administrative Services Facilities Liaison at (512) 239-0080. Persons requesting accommodations for the San Antonio hearing should contact Austin Bailey at (512) 239-6956. Requests should be made as far in advance as possible.

Written comments should reference the Edwards Aquifer Protection Program and may be sent to Austin Bailey, Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, Field Operation Program Support Section, MC 174, P.O. Box 13087, Austin, Texas 78711-3087, faxed to (512) 239-2249, or e-mailed to austin.bailey@tceq.texas.gov. Comments must be received by 5:00 p.m., January 16, 2015. For further information or questions concerning these hearings, please contact Mr. Bailey at (512) 239-6956, or http://www.tceq.texas.gov/field/eapp/history.html.

Program Updates

Change to the Administrative Review Process
Beginning Nov. 1, 2014, the Application Submission and Review process will change for EAPP applications. Important information

Public Meetings

The TCEQ is holding its annual public hearings to receive comments about protecting the Edwards Aquifer from pollution. There will be a meeting in Austin and one in San Antonio:

Dec. 16, 2014, Austin
Dec. 17, 2014, San Antonio

Important information